Filtering by: C2ST

Apr
11
6:00 PM18:00

Making Things Meaningful in the Ice Age

The arts provide a key avenue of insight into ancient human behavior and symbolic evolution. In this lecture we will review some of the evidence and analysis of how our ancestors of the later Ice Age used the material and visual world to create meanings, to develop and solidify social relationships, and to become “effective world settlers.” The scope of what we call “Paleolithic art” will be a focus because it is such a well-preserved collection of material and so many new and exciting ways of studying it have developed over the past years.

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Mar
30
6:00 PM18:00

The Physics of Baseball

Dr Alan Nathan spent a career doing experimental nuclear physics, where he studied the high-speed collisions of subatomic particles. These days he spends his time working on the physics of baseball, studying the not-so-high-speed collisions of baseballs with bats, among other things. And believe it or not, many of the same principles that apply to the former also apply to the latter. He will provide a flavor for that in this talk by telling us about some of the interesting physics apparent to him each and every time he watches a game.

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Mar
22
3:15 PM15:15

Recent Advances in CO2 Storage Science and Technology

  • Perlstein Hall Auditorium - Room 131 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

While the fundamental scientific underpinnings of CO2 storage build on a century-long exploration of the physics of multiphase flow in porous media, there are aspects that remain unexplored and warrant further investigation. In this talk, Professor Benson will review recent experimental and theoretical research on multiphase flow of CO2 and brine in heterogeneous rocks, pore and continuum scale studies of the stability of residually trapped CO2, and monitoring of CO2 migration using pressure transient data. The implications of the findings from advances in CO2 storage science will be discussed for realworld projects.

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Mar
7
7:00 PM19:00

Tales From the Sea: How do Baby Fish and Other Marine Species Find Forever Homes?

You will hear about breakthroughs and technologies during the past decade that have enabled marine biologists to better study the small and often transparent larvae as they disperse through the waters. Modern approaches often involve bringing the laboratory directly into the ocean: observing behavior in the wild and removing the veil that has long obscured our views of this critical but cryptic life stage.

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Jan
10
7:00 PM19:00

Why in the World Haven’t We Cured Alzheimer’s by Now?

In this lecture, you will hear about work conducted by Beth Stutzmann, Ph.D, and her research team at Rosalind Franklin University/The Chicago Medical School. She and her team have found a signaling abnormality that emerges early in the disease process, and it is directly linked to the cellular mechanisms that form and preserve memories. Not only does this signaling deficit alter memory function, it also accelerates beta amyloid formation and many other AD features. They have also developed novel compounds to normalize this pathological process, and are working to bring this to the clinic for an effective means to preserve memory functions in AD patients.

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Nov
17
5:30 PM17:30

Climate Change and Energy Needs: Finding a Path to Sustainability

Maria T. Zuber, Ph.D., is the Vice President for Research and E.A. Griswold Professor of Geophysics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Maria Zuber’s research focuses on the structure and tectonics of solid solar system objects. She specializes in using gravity and laser altimetry measurements to determine interior structure and evolution and has been involved in more than half a dozen NASA planetary missions aimed at mapping the Moon, Mars, Mercury, as well as several asteroids. She was principal investigator for the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) and as such became the first woman to lead a NASA spacecraft mission. She received her Ph.D. in geophysics from Brown University.

Join Dr. Zuber as she explains why fusion, the same nuclear reaction from which the Sun draws its energy, may not be as far off as you think, and why driving an electric car might not reduce your carbon footprint — yet. Attendance is free, but registration is strongly encouraged. To register, click HERE. Seating is first come, first serve, and registration does not guarantee a seat

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Oct
4
7:00 PM19:00

C2ST Speakeasy: "The Metabolism of a Marathon" with Kelly Kester

Kelly Kester is an Account Executive at HDMZ, a life science and healthcare agency. She started her career in Clinical Research as a Registered Dietitian after graduating with her master's in Clinical Nutrition from Rush University Medical Center. A self-proclaimed "RunNerd," Kelly qualified for the Boston Marathon during the 2015 Chicago Marathon. She has completed marathons from Athens Greece to her hometown of Chicago.

Come listen to Kelly speak about her research! She will help us explore the physiological challenges and surprising sights along the 26.2 mile route of a marathon, including the occasional goofy motivational sign.

C2ST Speakeasy is held on the first Tuesday of every month. Attendance is free, but registration is strongly encouraged. To register, click HERE. Seating is first come, first serve, and registration does not guarantee a seat. 

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Sep
28
5:30 PM17:30

The Heart of Marine Biodiversity: Saving the Verde Island Passage

The science behind the discovery of the amazing concentration of marine biodiversity in the Philippines is clear to biologists and non-scientists alike. This global wonder is at risk from numerous threats but conservation effort in the Verde Island Passage showcase the determination to preserve this natural heritage. This program will highlight the discovery of the “center of the center” of marine biodiversity, recent successes in marine conservation in the Verde Island Passage and the need for these efforts to continue.

This presentation will also highlight how the SEA-VIP Institute will use Science, Education, and Advocacy programs to empower local stakeholders to preserve the marine biodiversity resources in the Verde Island Passage.  Come discover the amazing beauty, crucial importance, and delicate fragility of this very important marine corridor!

$10 per person. Ticket required for entry. Limited number of tickets available. Tickets will be available shortly. Visit here for more details.

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Sep
27
6:00 PM18:00

How the Indoor Microbiome Influence Health

  • British International School of Chicago (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Jack A. Gilbert, Ph.D. is the Director of the Microbiome Center and a Professor of Surgery at the University of Chicago. He is also Group Leader for Microbial Ecology at Argonne National Laboratory, Associate Director of the Institute of Genomic and Systems Biology, Research Associate at the Field Museum of Natural History, and Senior Scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory. Dr. Gilbert uses molecular analysis to test fundamental hypotheses in microbial ecology. He has authored more than 200 peer reviewed publications and book chapters on metagenomics and approaches to ecosystem ecology. He is currently working on generating observational and mechanistic models of microbial communities in natural, urban, built and human ecosystems. He is on the advisory board of the Genomic Standards Consortium (www.gensc.org), and is the founding Editor in Chief of mSystems journal. In 2014 he was recognized on Crain’s Business Chicago’s 40 Under 40 List, and in 2015 he was listed as one of the 50 most influential scientists by Business Insider, and in the Brilliant Ten by Popular Scientist.

Come listen as Dr. Gilbert discusses some of the recent evidence highlighting the elaborate and intricate mechanisms of interaction between the microbiome and the immune system, and how the last 150 years have started to disturb the delicate balance of the immune-microbe equilibrium.

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Sep
6
7:00 PM19:00

C2ST Speakeasy: "Inherited Effects of Teenage Binge Drinking" with AnnaDorthea Asimes

AnnaDorothea (Andie) Asimes is a PhD candidate in Neuroscience at Loyola University Chicago. She grew up in Cleveland and earned her BA in Neuroscience from Kenyon College in 2013 before coming to Chicago. She is entering her fourth year of her PhD, studying how binge alcohol consumption during puberty can cause long-lasting and intergenerational changes in brain function. This research is the first of its kind to investigate the effects of both maternal and paternal preconception alcohol exposure on offspring epigenetics. After completion of her PhD, Andie hopes to start her own lab and continue researching the effects of binge alcohol exposure in the brain. 

Come listen to Andie speak about her research! C2ST Speakeasy is held on the first Tuesday of every month. Attendance is free, but registration is strongly encouraged. To register, click HERE. Seating is first come, first serve, and registration does not guarantee a seat. 

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Aug
17
6:00 PM18:00

The Secret Lives of Female Chimpanzees

By combining decades of behavioral research with innovative non-invasive approaches, Dr. Emery Thompson and her colleagues at the Kibale Chimpanzee Project have uncovered fascinating details about the secret lives of female chimpanzees. She will discuss how females negotiate rivalries to obtain the resources they need to reproduce, the chaotic, and sometimes violent, nature of sexual relationships with males, and the unexpected ways these relationships change with age. Along the way, you will learn about the challenges and rewards of studying this fascinating species in the wild.

Pre-registration is required. Tickets are $12 for general admission or $6 for students.

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